US Supreme Court allows full enforcement of President Trump's travel ban
December 5, 2017

The United States Supreme Court on 4 December 2017 ruled that the travel ban imposed on six Muslim countries by President Donald Trump can now go fully into effect. 

Out of the bench of nine justices, seven justices lifted the ban imposed by lower courts on the policy. Only Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor asserted that the President's order should remain blocked.

However, the directive against travellers from Chad, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen still faces legal challenges. The new ban also bars travellers from North Korea and Venezuela, but they were not affected by the injunctions.

The justices of the US Supreme Court acted just after the American Civil Liberties Union, which is leading one of the lawsuits, sent a letter to the court pointing out to anti-Muslim videos that were tweeted by Donald Trump.

Now, San Francisco-based 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals and the 4th US Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia will be holding arguments on the legality of the ban.


The latest travel ban issued by President Donald bars various people from eight countries- Syria, Libya, Iran, Yemen, Chad, Somalia, North Korea and Venezuela. Six of the countries have Muslim-majority populations.

However, Federal Judges in Maryland and Hawaii blocked the implementation of this ban for foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with people in the United States such as grandparents, grandchildren, brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.